Thursday, October 27, 2011


Here is a fun little story from the blog Stop The Drug War.  It seems that the brave warriors in the War on Drugs, are doing all right for themselves.  This if really no surprise.  What I like about this article is that it puts together a nifty little diary of a week in said War and how it all worked out for a representative sample of DA's, cops, "corrections" officers, and the like.  

I guess you had to be there.  

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A Texas DA gets greedy, and so do a California narc, a California prison worker, a Washington state evidence clerk, and a Washington, DC, police officer. Let's get to it:
In Center, Texas, the Shelby County District Attorney's office is one focus of a federal criminal investigation into allowing arrested drug traffickers to buy their way out of trouble by letting the county seize their cash. The feds are now reviewing whether DA Lynda Kaye Russell cut illegal deals with defendants in a bid to bolster her county's asset forfeiture account, which took in more than $800,000 in less than a year. An Associated Press investigation found "numerous examples of suspects who went unpunished or got unusually light sentences after turning over tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars." In one case, a man caught with 15 kilos of cocaine and $80,000 in cash got probation after forfeiting the money to the DA; in another, a woman found with $620,000 in cash stuffed in Christmas presents walked free after turning over the money. Shelby County's law enforcement practices gained national notoriety in 2008 when a still pending class action lawsuit accused the county of targeting black motorists and threatening to jail or prosecute them if they didn't agree to forfeit their cash. Russell has been DA since 1999 and implemented a "drug enforcement" program on the highway through the county in 2006.

In Oakland, California, a former San Ramon police officer and Contra Costa sheriff's deputy was arraigned Tuesdayon federal charges related to the ongoing Central Costa Narcotics Enforcement Team (CCNET) corruption probe. Louis Lombardi, 39, is accused of stealing cash and drugs during police raids, selling marijuana and methamphetamine, and conspiring with his CCNET commander to set up a marijuana grow operation. He faces nine felony and misdemeanor counts and is looking at up to 60 years in prison. His attorney says he will cop a plea shortly. Three other CCNET officers, including its former commander, have already been charged in the case, and a fourth is likely to be charged soon.

In San Rafael, California, a former California Department of Corrections warehouse supervisor was arraigned Monday on charges he brought marijuana to San Quentin Prison to sell to an inmate. Robert Alioto, 48, had been arrested on October 5 and was fired the next day. He was charged with bringing a controlled substance into a state prison, selling or furnishing a controlled substance to a prisoner, and possession of marijuana for sale. He's looking at up to five years in prison if convicted.

In Washington, DC, a former Metro DC police officer was sentenced last Friday to 15 years in prison for his role in the botched attempted robbery of a drug dealer that resulted in the fatal shooting of one of the would-be robbers by one of his companions. Former officer Reginald Jones, 42, acted as a lookout from his patrol car as five men attempted the robbery. As the drug dealer was being assaulted, his girlfriend ran to Jones' police car seeking assistance, but Jones instead sped off. He pleaded guilty to second degree murder and conspiracy to commit robbery.

In Port Angeles, Washington, a former Clallam County sheriff's evidence officer was convicted last Friday of stealing money from the evidence room. Staci Allison was accused of making off with at least $8,600 and, despite her protestations of innocence, she was convicted on counts of first-degree theft and money laundering. She's looking at up to 10 years in prison when sentenced next month.

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