Tuesday, January 07, 2014


Most of what you will read in the attached article below you probably read somewhere else.  What makes the piece to come scary is the fact that the author has put it all together in one salad bowl full of "eyes" all looking at you.

Snowden may have released information about the NSA spying on us, nothing new there really, but what the NSA is and has been doing for years is nothing compared to what is really going and what is on the verge of going on.  Way back when I was in my twenties and fighting "THE REVOLUTION" you could hide.  I'm not sure just how you do that anymore.  To go underground you have to go way way way underground and you'd better do it real real real fast because someone is tracking you somewhere, everywhere, sometime, all the time.  It isn't easy fighting a STATE that has you virtually always in its sights.   It's not really a brave new world, its a damn ugly new world.

I mean, lets face it, THEY know, if they care to know that I am sitting here typing this right now (and that you are sitting there reading this then)...or if they want, they will know tomorrow.  Whether they care is only a matter of how big of a deal they think you or I happen to be.

Popular resistance will require a certain bravery and a great deal more solidarity and participation then we have seen in a long, long time, if ever. 

Again, none of this means, there is nothing that can be done.  None of this means that we should throw up our hands and surrender to Big Brother.  It doesn't mean that.  It does mean that just as we need to understand the capitalism today is not capitalism of yesterday, we need to recognize that the repressive abilities of the STATE today are way different then they were yesterday.  

We need to also understand that many who consider themselves in the forefront of the struggle, who think of themselves as irreplaceable are nothing of the can.  Those who think like that have to change the way they think or just get out of the way.  They may find it difficult to think in new ways, but the multitude does not really have that problem, not for long.

The multitude  adjusts.  The multitude adapts.  The multitude evolves.

And for god's sake, none of this means we are back to the time of Lenin and need some sort of vanguard party.  I think it means just the opposite.  It is time for every one of us who want to be on the side of history must understand that the only possibility of truly dealing with global capital lies in the power of the multitude.  It does not lie with some revolutionary vanguard.  The way of Lenin's organizational type is gone, long gone.  Trying to bring it back is reactionary.

In fact, just as I believe that it is the working class which drives forward the class struggle.  Just as I believe that it is Capital that reacts to the multitude and not the other way around.  Just as the changes in the composition of labor and the resistance of labor forces Capital to change in response.  I believe the same applies to that very important function of the STATE, which is  simply to use force to protect its/their capitalist masters.  The multitude, working people will, I am confident, find new ways to push ahead, and in reaction the STATE will be forced to try and develops new ways to stop the masses of working people which represent such a threat to itself and to global capital.

So, time to move forward  again...the multitude can never be and will never be static.  The multitude  is dynamic, Capital is reactive.

Meanwhile, a description of where capital's repressive apparatus, the State is will help show us where the multitude will go tactically tomorrow.

The State may see the multitude, but the State cannot stop the multitude.  The truth is all the security, eyes in skies, data collective tools, all of that are nothing in comparison to the potential, to the very real power of the multitude.

So though you may have thought at the beginning of this introduction that I was proclaiming doom and gloom, I am not.  

The author of the piece below seems to think we are living in a concentration camp of sorts.  

He is wrong.

The multitude are not surrounded by impenetrable barriers.

It is capital that is surrounded and it is surrounded by the earth's multitudes.

That spectre that was haunting Europe in 1848 is haunting all of global capital in 2014.

The following is from OpEd News.

Life in the Electronic Concentration Camp: The Many Ways That You're Being Tracked, Catalogued and Controlled

By John Whitehead

"[A security camera] doesn't respond to complaint, threats, or insults. Instead, it just watches you in a forbidding manner. Today, the surveillance state is so deeply enmeshed in our data devices that we don't even scream back because technology companies have convinced us that we need to be connected to them to be happy."--Pratap Chatterjee, journalist

What is most striking about the American police state is not the mega-corporations running amok in the halls of Congress, the militarized police crashing through doors and shooting unarmed citizens, or the invasive surveillance regime which has come to dominate every aspect of our lives. No, what has been most disconcerting about the emergence of the American police state is the extent to which the citizenry appears content to passively wait for someone else to solve our nation's many problems. Unless Americans are prepared to engage in militant nonviolent resistance in the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr. and Gandhi, true reform, if any, will be a long time coming.

Yet as I detail in my book A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State, if we don't act soon, all that is in need of fixing will soon be unfixable, especially as it relates to the police state that becomes more entrenched with each passing day. By "police state," I am referring to more than a society overrun by the long arm of the police. I am referring to a society in which all aspects of a person's life are policed by government agents, one in which all citizens are suspects, their activities monitored and regulated, their movements tracked, their communications spied upon, and their lives, liberties and pursuit of happiness dependent on the government's say-so.

That said, how can anyone be expected to "fix" what is broken unless they first understand the lengths to which the government with its arsenal of technology is going in order to accustom the American people to life in a police state and why being spied on by government agents, both state and federal, as well as their partners in the corporate world, is a problem, even if you've done nothing wrong. 

Indeed, as the trend towards overcriminalization makes clear, it won't be long before the average law-abiding American is breaking laws she didn't even know existed during the course of a routine day. The point, of course, is that while you may be oblivious to your so-called law-breaking--whether it was collecting rainwater to water your lawn, lighting a cigarette in the privacy of your home, or gathering with friends in your backyard for a Sunday evening Bible study--the government will know each and every transgression and use them against you.

As noted by the Brookings Institution, "For the first time ever, it will become technologically and financially feasible for authoritarian governments to record nearly everything that is said or done within their borders -- every phone conversation, electronic message, social media interaction, the movements of nearly every person and vehicle, and video from every street corner."

As the following will show, the electronic concentration camp, as I have dubbed the surveillance state, is perhaps the most insidious of the police state's many tentacles, impacting almost every aspect of our lives and making it that much easier for the government to encroach on our most vital freedoms, ranging from free speech, assembly and the press to due process, privacy, and property, by eavesdropping on our communications, tracking our movements and spying on our activities.

Tracking you based on your consumer activities: Fusion centers, federal-state law enforcement partnerships which attempt to aggregate a variety of data on so-called "suspicious persons," have actually collected reports on people buying pallets of bottled water, photographing government buildings, and applying for a pilot's license as "suspicious activity." Retailers are getting in on the surveillance game as well. Large corporations such as Target have been tracking and assessing the behavior of their customers, particularly their purchasing patterns, for years. In 2015, mega-food corporations will be rolling out high-tech shelving outfitted with cameras in order to track the shopping behavior of customers, as well as information like the age and sex of shoppers.

Tracking you based on your public activities: Sensing a booming industry, private corporations are jumping on the surveillance state bandwagon, negotiating lucrative contracts with police agencies throughout the country in order to create a web of surveillance that encompasses all major urban centers. Companies such as NICE and Bright Planet are selling equipment and services to police departments with the promise of monitoring large groups of people seamlessly, as in the case of protests and rallies. They are also engaging in extensive online surveillance, looking for any hints of "large public events, social unrest, gang communications, and criminally predicated individuals." Defense contractors are attempting to take a bite out of this lucrative market as well. Raytheon has recently developed a software package known as Riot, which promises to predict the future behavior of an individual based upon his social media posts.

Tracking you based on your phone activities: The CIA has been paying AT&T over $10 million per year in order to gain access to data on Americans' phone calls abroad. This is in addition to telecommunications employees being embedded in government facilities to assist with quick analysis of call records and respond to government requests for customer location data. They receive hundreds of thousands of such requests per year.

Tracking you based on your computer activities: Federal agents now employ a number of hacking methods in order to gain access to your computer activities and "see" whatever you're seeing on your monitor. Malicious hacking software can be installed via a number of inconspicuous methods, including USB, or via an email attachment or software update. It can then be used to search through files stored on a hard drive, log keystrokes, or take real time screenshots of whatever a person is looking at on their computer, whether personal files, web pages, or email messages. It can also be used to remotely activate cameras and microphones, offering another means of glimpsing into the personal business of a target.

Tracking you based on your behavior: Thanks to a torrent of federal grants, police departments across the country are able to fund outrageous new surveillance systems that turn the most basic human behaviors into suspicious situations to be studied and analyzed. Police in California, Massachusetts, and New York have all received federal funds to create systems like that operated by the New York Police Department, which "links 3,000 surveillance cameras with license plate readers, radiation sensors, criminal databases and terror suspect lists." Police all across the country are also now engaging in big data mining operations, often with the help of private companies, in order to develop city-wide nets of surveillance. For example, police in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, now work with IBM in order to "integrate new data and analytics tools into everyday crime fighting."

Tracking you based on your face: Facial recognition software promises to create a society in which every individual who steps out into public is tracked and recorded as they go about their daily business. The goal is for government agents to be able to scan a crowd of people and instantaneously identify all of the individuals present. Facial recognition programs are being rolled out in states all across the country (only twelve states do not use facial recognition software). For example, in Ohio, 30,000 police officers and court employees are able to access the driver's license images of people in the state, without any form of oversight to track their views or why they're accessing them. The FBI is developing a $1 billion program, Next Generation Identification, which involves creating a massive database of mugshots for police all across the country.

Tracking you based on your car: License plate readers, which can identify the owner of any car that comes within its sights, are growing in popularity among police agencies. Affixed to overpasses or cop cars, these devices give police a clear idea of where your car was at a specific date and time, whether the doctor's office, the bar, the mosque, or at a political rally. State police in Virginia used license plate readers to record every single vehicle that arrived to President Barack Obama's inauguration in 2009 from Virginia. They also recorded the license plates of attendees at rallies prior to the election, including for then-candidate Obama and Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin. This data collection came at the request of the U.S. Secret Service. Incredibly, Virginia police stored data on some 8 million license plates, some for up to three years.

Tracking you based on your social media activities: The obsession with social media as a form of surveillance will have some frightening consequences in coming years. As Helen A.S. Popkin, writing for NBC News, has astutely observed, "We may very well face a future where algorithms bust people en masse for referencing illegal 'Game of Thrones' downloads, or run sweeps for insurance companies seeking non-smokers confessing to lapsing back into the habit. Instead of that one guy getting busted for a lame joke misinterpreted as a real threat, the new software has the potential to roll, Terminator-style, targeting every social media user with a shameful confession or questionable sense of humor."

Tracking you based on your metadata: Metadata is an incredibly invasive set of data to have on a person. Indeed, with access to one's metadata, one can "identify people's friends and associates, detect where they were at a certain time, acquire clues to religious or political affiliations, and pick up sensitive information like regular calls to a psychiatrist's office, late-night messages to an extramarital partner or exchanges with a fellow plotter." The National Security Agency (NSA) has been particularly interested in metadata, compiling information on Americans' social connections "that can identify their associates, their locations at certain times, their traveling companions and other personal information." Mainway, the main NSA tool used to connect the dots on American social connections, collected 700 million phone records per day in 2011. That number increased by 1.1 billion in August 2011. The NSA is now working on creating "a metadata repository capable of taking in 20 billion 'record events' daily and making them available to N.S.A. analysts within 60 minutes."

Tracking you from the skies: Nothing, and I mean nothing, will escape government eyes, especially when drones take to the skies in 2015. These gadgets, ranging from the colossal to the miniature, will have the capability of seeing through the walls of your home and tracking your every movement.

To put it bluntly, we are living in an electronic concentration camp. Through a series of imperceptible steps, we have willingly allowed ourselves to become enmeshed in a system that knows the most intimate details of our lives, analyzes them, and treats us accordingly. Whether via fear of terrorism, narcissistic pleasure, or lazy materialism, we have slowly handed over our information to all sorts of entities, corporate and governmental, public and private, who are now using that information to cow and control us for their profit. As George Orwell warned, "You had to live--did live, from habit that became instinct--in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized." 

Thus, we have arrived in Orwell's world. The question now is: will we take a stand and fight to remain free or will we go gently into the concentration camp?

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